Archery

Safety Rules:
1 No student shall use archery tackle or range without the direct supervision of the P.E. teacher. You are dealing with lethal weapons.
2 No arrow is to be placed (nocked) in the bow until the signal is given.
3 Arrows shall not be pointed or aimed in any direction except when in the shooting line and in shooting position and only towards the target. Never shoot diagonally at a target (cross shooting).
4 The bow is to be drawn only when one is straddling the shooting line (only upon the command shoot).
5 The student's partner must always stand behind his/her partner at the restraining line (as designated by the instructor).
6 All archers shoot at the same time and retrieve at the same time. Wait for a signal from the teacher to begin shooting and to retrieve arrows.
7 Step back after shooting an "end".
8 In case of a "hanging arrow, all shooting and nocking of arrows shall cease while the arrow is made upright in the target. Shooting will start again on the teacher's signal.
9 Only safe tackle shall be used and all splintered arrows, cracked bows, etc. shall be given to the instructor for repair.
Technique:
Stance
A Left side toward target with face turned toward target.
B Weight equally distributed on both feet.
C Feet just far enough apart for good balance (8 to 16 inches). One foot on each side of shooting line (straddling shooting line).
Nocking Arrow
A The arrow is nocked perpendicular to bow string.
B Cock feather is away from the bow (perpendicular to the nock of the arrow).
Draw
A Left hand is laced so that bow rests in heel of hand, wrist is behind bow, bow held loosely with thumb and forefinger.
B Left arm is slightly bent, (elbow rotated down and out) in such a position so that if bend was continued the arm would swing in toward the body like a door closing. (The elbow joint is the hinge).
C First, second, and third finger on bow string, string cutting somewhere betweenthe first joint and end of finger, preferably nearer the joint than end of fingers, but not in joint. The arrow rests between the first and second fingers with very littlecontact but no pressure on nock.
Draw takes place by use of upper arm and shoulder muscles, increasing the speed between the shoulders. Shoulders come back, bringing shoulder blades together. Right elbow in back at full draw, in direct line of point of arrow. No pulling is done.
Anchor
A Forefinger comes right under the jaw bone at completion of draw. If this is too difficult the forefinger may rest along the side of the jaw bone or on the jaw bone,the end of the forefinger resting at the centre of the chin. The thumb is replaced completely without use in the anchor.
B String touches tip of nose and centre of chin.
C Anchor must be the same on every shot, firm and comfortable for the individual.
Aiming or Holding
A Necessary to hold two or three or more seconds to be sure point of arrow is directly on point of aim, or so that you can see the point of aim resting right on top of the point of your arrow, on every shot.
B Hold long enough to be sure muscles are steadied. It is necessary to keep the muscular tension through the upper back muscles, or, due to muscle fatigue, the arrow will creep forward, before the loose.
C Line of vision. Right eye uses aiming, line of vision goes from right eye to right of bow string and left of bow to point of arrow. It is usually necessary to close the left eye.
Loose on Release
A Right hand - relax fingers of right hand which causes string to roll off fingers smoothly. The action of the tension on the back muscles which bring the right elbow back will cause the right hand to ride backward along the side of the neck. This is a natural reaction and not a conscious motion. Left hand - keep left arm in same position as at full draw. Relax the wrist and allow bow to do as it wants to do. Avoid gripping the bow.
Follow through of Afterhold
A Hold the position assumed after the release until after the arrow lands. Analyse your shot completely in the afterhold by checking up on where your right hand ended the release, where bow hand is, etc. Keep eyes on point of aim.
Factors which cause the released arrow to ride high:
1
Riding the bow (extension of bow arm on the release).
2
Increasing slightly the pull on the string just before release.
3
Lifting the bow arm.
4
Lifting the index finger of the bow hand.
5
Nocking the arrow low on the string.
6
Allowing the third finger to "slip" on the string.
7
Dropping of elbow or string hand just before release.
Factors which cause the released arrow to ride low:
1
A "creeping" release.
2
Not reaching or not holding at anchor point.
3
Dropping bow arm.
4
Releasing forward with chin to string.
5
Nocking the arrow high on the string.
6
Using an understrung bow which causes string to hit wrist.
7
Holding low on bow handle.
8
Too high an anchor.
9
Holding too low so that fatigued muscles "give" too quickly.
Factors which cause the released arrow to veer to the right:
1
Throwing bow arm to the right.
2
Plucking the string on release.
3
Tilting the bow to the right.
4
Failing to align the aim(sight)with the centre of the target too far to the right.
5
Failing to allow for wind from the left.
6
Head tilt to the right.
7
Pulling fingers off string too quickly, whether from lack of protection or from soreness.
8
Weight on the toes or toward the fore part of the foot.
9
Gripping the bow string too high on the fingers.
Factors which cause the released arrow to veer to the left:
1
Throwing bow arm to the right.
2
Fingers too tightly gripping the arrow.
3
Tilting the bow to the left.
4
Failure to align rim with the centre of target -- too far to the left.
5
Failure to allow for wind from the right.
6
String touching hunched left shoulder.
7
Using left eye to sight.
8
Weight on heels or swaying slightly toward heels.
9
Head dropped backward rather than rotated to left.
10
Too tight a grip on bow.
11
Sighting to left of string.

Bow Diagram:


Menu